Pornhub wants Twitter to face the full wrath of the Digital Economy Bill…At least porn censor designate, David Austin, recognises that maybe it might not be a good idea to ban adults from accessing their porn

Posted: 31 January, 2017 in Dgital Economy Bill, Internet Blocking, Uncategorized
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Read more uk_internet_censors.htm at MelonFarmers.co.uk

westminster eforum logoAn interesting article in Wired reports on a a recent Westminster eForum meeting when the British establishment got together to discuss, porn, internet censorship and child protection.A large portion of the article considers the issue that porn is not generally restricted just to ‘porn websites’. It is widely available on more mainstream wesbites such as Google Images. Stephen Winyard, director and VP of ICM Registry and council member of the digital policy alliance, argued that Twitter is in fact commercially benefiting from the proliferation of pornography on the network:

It’s on Twitter, Reddit, Tumblr, mobile apps – Skype is used hugely for adult content. But Twitter is the largest platform for promoting pornography in the world – and it takes money for it. They pay Twitter money to advertise adult content.

Another good good pint was that the Digital Censorship Bill going through parliament was targetting the prevention of children ‘stumbling across’ porn. Hence a bit of partial blockade of porn may somehow reduce this problem. However Adam Kinsley of Sky pointed out that partial blockage may not be so effective in stopping kids actively looking for porn. He noted:

The Digital Economy Bill’s exact objectives are a little uncertain, but we are trying to stop children stumbling on pornography — but they are not ‘stumbling’, they are looking for it and Twitter is where they will [find] it. Whether what the government is proposing will deal with that threat is unclear. Initially, it did not propose ISPs blocking content. When it comes to extremist sites, the Home Office asks social media platforms to take down content. The government does not ask us to block material – it has never done that. So this is a big deal. It doesn’t happen with the IWF; it doesn’t happen with terrorist material, and it wasn’t in the government’s original proposal. Whether they got it right and how will we deal with these millions of sites, is unclear.

We’re not really achieving anything if only dealing with a few sites.

The Bill is incredibly complex, as it stands. David Austin, from the BBFC, pointed out that for it to implement the bill correctly, it needs to be effective, proportionate, respectful of privacy, accountable – and the

Tens of millions of adults that go online to see legal content must be able to continue to do so.

At the same time, he said:

There is no silver bullet, no one model, no one sector that can achieve all child protection goals.

…Read the full article from wired.co.uk

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