Archive for the ‘BBFC critics’ Category

Read more Latest UK Cuts at MelonFarmers.co.uk

See article from bbfc.co.uk

woman in blackThe Woman in Black is a 2012 UK/Canada/Sweden ghost story by James Watkins.
With Daniel Radcliffe, Janet McTeer and Ciarแn Hinds. See IMDb.

The film has been passed 12A after 6s of BBFC category cuts for intense supernatural threat and horror for:

  • UK 2012 cinema release

The BBFC commented:

Distributor chose to reduce moments of strong violence / horror in order to achieve a 12A classification. Cuts made in line with BBFC Guidelines and policy. A 15 classification without cuts was available.

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Read more UK Nutter News at MelonFarmers.co.uk

See article from independent.co.uk

UKCTCS logoTobacco campaigners have attacked incompetent film regulators and insouciant politicians for failing to act upon evidence suggesting that teenagers are being lured into smoking by seeing it in movies.

The call by the UK Centre for Tobacco Control Studies for a complete overhaul of film regulation to protect young people from pervasive and highly damaging imagery has been rejected despite what the centre considers compelling evidence.

Alison Lyons and John Britton from the centre wrote:

Smoking in films remains a major and persistent driver of smoking uptake among children and young people, which the actions of irresponsible film makers, incompetent regulators and insouciant politicians are abjectly failing to control.

Researchers at the University of Bristol found that 15-year-olds most exposed to films in which characters smoked were 73% cent more likely to have tried a cigarette, and nearly 50% more likely to be a current smoker, than those who watched the fewest films featuring smoking.

The campaigners call for films that feature smoking to be automatically classified as 18 and to be regarded as dangerous as illicit drugs and violence.

A Department of Culture, Sports and Media spokesman said:

The Government believes the current arrangements provide sufficient control on the depiction of smoking in films and a total ban would be a disproportionate interference. This action would undermine the credibility, and therefore the quality, of domestically produced films.

Read more R18 Censor Cuts at MelonFarmers.co.uk

Leatherman: The Complete EditionLeatherman: The Complete Edition is a Japanese anime DVD released here by Black Chip Ltd

It was submitted to the BBFC for an R18 certificate in 2009

The BBFC specified cuts of by 9:07s. Three compulsory cuts were required to remove dialogue and subtitles suggesting a lack of consent to sex, and likely to encourage an interest in underage sex.

The uncut region 1 DVD is available at AnimeNation:

Kurusu (Leatherman) grabs a bag of belongings from a safe and takes off on his motorcycle. His past partner (Shisui) is instructed by his boss to tell Kurusu to come back with the items he took from the sage to avoid certain death. Because Kurusu is trying to evade capture he experiences many difficulties – most notably, having elicit sexual encounters with many beautiful women. How will Kurusu get out of this situation, and what is in his bag that is so important?

Trash House DVDA quick look around the shelves of my local Blockbuster (which, as a chain, has its own problems), reveals that very nearly all the straight-to-DVD horror on their shelves is put out by Sony or Lionsgate (oh, those tiny independents). Two years ago, when TrashHouse hit those shelves, there were at least a dozen distribution companies regularly putting out indie horror and getting decent distribution for it. Nowadays, they all seem to have either gone out of business or, at very best, gone into a kind of suspended animation whilst hoping to weather the storm. Companies are folding left and right; some of them, like Tartan, make headlines. Countless others have just quietly stopped putting out product and expired.

So we’re in a kind of limbo at the moment. The day a movie hits the shelves in a single territory it also hits the torrents worldwide, which can be fatal for an indie with no simultaneous worldwide release. There seems to be no way of making money on smaller movies. Obviously, the BBFC have done their very best to turn the knife by tightening their restrictions on things like commentaries, (which now have to be rated as a whole new work, thus adding vast amounts of money to the BBFC costs) and Behind The Scenes materials. Thus when an indie flick does manage to get out onto DVD in the current climate, it can’t even afford to have the full extras on the UK disc which might actually persuade people to buy it. And without economies of scale working in it’s favour, it’s gonna end up costing the consumer twice as much as a 2-disc set of a blockbuster. For a vanilla disc. And the consumer, understandably, will vote with their wallet.

I’ve seen awesome movies that would have been snapped up two years ago fail to find even basic distribution. There are, of course, other options to be explored. There’s a terrific blog over at Zen Films about their decision to self-distribute the movie Mindflesh which is a really interesting read.. Tragically, though, the BBFC requirements as they currently stand would make a UK version of the Amazon Unbox scheme mentioned in the article completely non-viable. Thus driving yet more of our independent film business out of the country.

The whole thing’s a total bummer for those who make and those who enjoy watching independent cinema.

Newspaper defines ‘bitch’ as a swear word for the purposes of a bollox survey

Where in the World is Osama Bin Laden Films containing ‘high levels of bad language’ are being approved for children to see at the cinema, a bollox investigation by The Sunday Telegraph has found.

Ten films cleared for children’s viewing were monitored for their use of expletives. In total, ‘fuck’ and its derivatives were used 17 times, ‘bitch’ 20 times, ‘ass’ 56 times and ‘shit’ 77 times.

All 10 films were passed recently by the BBFC with a rating of 12A, meaning that they can be watched in cinemas by over-12s alone, and by under-12s when accompanied by an adult.

The bollox findings come three weeks after this newspaper launched the ‘Vulgar Britain’ campaign, which has sparked a nationwide debate about standards on television, on radio and in films.

The investigation also found that films are being subjected to fewer cuts than ever by the BBFC. None of the 10 films studied was subjected to cuts before being awarded its 12A classification. So far this year, only five films, or 0.9% of the total released, have been required to make cuts by the BBFC to get their preferred classification – the lowest percentage since records began in 1914. Only one of the 159 films classified as 12A was subjected to cuts, even though many contain strong language, violence and scenes of a sexual nature. None of 45 films classified as 18 have had to cut any content.

Among the supposed offenders was Ghost Town, a comedy starring Ricky Gervais. It featured two uses of the ‘fuck’ and four ‘shit’. Shotgun Stories, an American film about two sets of feuding half brothers, featured the  ‘fuck’ three times and ‘shit’ 20 times. Another film monitored by this newspaper, Where in the World is Osama bin Laden?, a documentary about the war on terror directed by Morgan Spurlock, contained ‘fuck’ four times, ‘shit’ twice and the phrase ‘son of a bitch’ eight times.

On its website, the BBFC, which is funded by the film industry, states that it allowed the film to be released with no cuts. It adds: The four uses of that particular term ‘fuck’ in this case were allowed at 12A because the work was considered to be of educational value to an adolescent audience.

Sue Palmer, the educational consultant and author of Toxic Childhood said: It is absolutely terrifying that the BBFC considers it appropriate to subject our children to this level of effing and blinding.

Nigel Algar, a senior curator of fiction at the British Film Institute, said: There is a definite drift downwards in terms of what children are considered able to view, and these decisions are sometimes surprising.

John Beyer, the director of Mediawatch-UK, said the level of swearing in 12A films was scandalous. We are spending millions of pounds on trying to improve education skills but by allowing these films through without cutting some of the swearing, the BBFC is undermining these efforts and normalising the use of obscene language by children.

A spokesman for the BBFC said: The role of the BBFC is not to see how many cuts we can make to films but to put them in the most appropriate age category. All our age category guidelines are based on extensive consultation with the public, so our classifications are a direct reflection of what the public think.

At present, the use of the f-word up to four times in a 12A film is considered acceptable. These guidelines are currently being looked at again, in a public consultation of more than 11,000 people, and if the public tell us that there is too much swearing at the 12A level, we will take this into account.